Bratislava Resolution

The Bratislava Resolution was adopted by the assembly, on the occasion of a gathering of producers, broadcasters and others interested in production for children, and in sharing experiences, East and West. Over 70 participants came from 30 countries. The meeting was called by CIFEJ (the International Centre of Films for Children and Young People), hosted by the Biennale of Animation, and held in Bratislava, Slovakia, in November 1994.


 

Soon, Mankind will enter the Third Millennium. The cinema will celebrate its 100th anniversary. Television is a little bit younger.

As we reach the crossroads of the year 2000, the importance of children’s film continues to grow, as does the need for children to see these films. We can know that.

As we reach the crossroads of the year 2000, the importance of We live and will live, people from North and South, East and West, in a changing and dynamic world. Mankind will reach new heights in knowledge and in achievement. Children, who are our hope for the future, have the right to benefit from these general developments.

As we reach the crossroads of the year 2000, the importance of As specialists in children’s cinema and television, we appreciate that the increasing impact of film, television and other media on our children demands more specific care and action with an aim to achieving better quality in the lives of the young people.

As we reach the crossroads of the year 2000, the importance of Good quality films and television programmes for children can and must carry positive fundamental human values. These will help and support the development of a personal conscience in young people, and add new dimensions to their basic social behaviour and to their knowledge of the world.

As we reach the crossroads of the year 2000, the importance of Good quality children’s films and television programmes can and must encourage the process of creative thinking, of deciding and of acting in full liberty in order that children can build their own personalities and their future.

As we reach the crossroads of the year 2000, the importance of Good quality children’s films and television programmes can and must reveal and stress the basic values of each people and of each nation, according to their traditions, the social and cultural backgrounds upon which they are founded, and the national identity of each country. At the same time, these nations must share these values with others in a general harvest of human spirituality.

As we reach the crossroads of the year 2000, the importance of Good quality children’s films can also travel across borders, playing a leading role in the building of the world of tomorrow, helping to define the place in which our children will live.

As we reach the crossroads of the year 2000, the importance of For all these reasons, we think that the governments, the parliaments, the national and international agencies and organizations around the world must recognize, through support of production and distribution of children’s films, a duty to the future of each nation and of the entire world.
There are several ways to achieve such goals:

  • stimulating increased production of children’s films and television, on a national level, by raising and investing more funds

  • building a support system for wider and better distribution of those children’s films whose artistic and educational values are more important than their commercial aspects

  • encouraging the use on a large scale of production for children in schools and in other educational institutions and activities

  • supporting the spread of quality children’s screenings in all social areas

  • financing and developing the education and training of specialists – scriptwriters, directors and others – of children’s production

  • stimulating and financing scientific research about the reaction of children to the media, and about the way they use media for their specific needs

  • helping national and international professional organizations and associations dealing with the issues surrounding children’s film and television to achieve and develop their activities.

We are sure that the governments, the parliaments, the national and international agencies and organizations are aware that supporting children’s film and television production will serve the interests of each people, of each country, and will contribute to the building of a better world, one in which we would like to live in at the threshold of the Third Millennium. Never forget that any little thing done for children now is an investment in the future.

November 1994

Dela